fbpx
11.16.2016 - by Joel Levin
Electric Vehicles – 2017 and Beyond

flag_of_the_united_statesFighting for change has never been easy. Plug In America has stood firm in its commitment to electric vehicles through a range of political climates; in fair weather and foul. Over many years, we have pushed both Democratic and Republican administrations to be bold in their support of EVs. And the reason we have been successful is that the case for EVs is strong and bipartisan. The benefits that EVs bring to our energy security, our manufacturing sector, and our economy have not changed at all since last week’s election.

The simple truth is that electric drive is a better technology for moving cars around, and it is getting better every day. Automotive engineers have done an outstanding job with the current generation of EVs and the coming 200-mile generation of vehicles will be even better. Those cars aren’t going away. Battery technology is on a roll – costs are coming down and capabilities are going up faster than anybody imagined. Driven by the promise of electric drive, creativity and disruption have been unleashed within the automobile industry as never before, and that is good for consumers and our economy. We should not out-source our innovation to other countries.

We must not forget that electricity is a 100% domestic source of energy that creates plenty of good-paying jobs and keeps dollars in the country. If the new administration is looking to invest in infrastructure, modernizing the electric grid should be a top candidate for investment dollars.

Most of the policies supporting EVs are at the state level, and the states have not changed. We will continue to work with state policymakers and regulators on strong policies that will accelerate the adoption of these vehicles for all drivers.

From the outset, EVs have been a bipartisan issue. Plenty of legislators from both parties, in states red and blue, drive EVs and are strong EV supporters.The current federal tax credits for EVs and charging infrastructure were both passed by a Republican-led Congress.

EVs have been embraced by Americans of every walk of life, every faith, every state, and every political stripe, and supported by numerous leading companies. This was evident in September, at National Drive Electric Week, which had events in nearly every state and major city across the country. Today, there are more than 530,000 plug in electric vehicles on American roads and dozens of makes and models rolling off the assembly lines.

Just as in the past, we can anticipate that there is a fight ahead for the future of the electric vehicle. It’s never been any different for us. And just as before, whatever comes, Plug In America will continue to serve as the national consumer voice for EVs. So we need your support, now more than ever. Please consider making a special contribution today to show that you stand with us and to demonstrate your continuing strong commitment to EVs.

3 comments on “Electric Vehicles – 2017 and Beyond”
  1. Patrick C says:

    Great article Joel. I have similar concerns that EVs need to be seen as a bipartisan issue or they will get bogged down in partisan politics. I have recently written:

    The American Conservative Case for Electric Vehicles:
    5 Reasons That Are Not The Environment
    http://www.carswithcords.net/2016/11/the-american-conservative-case-for.html

    I am not trying to say the environment does not matter. Rather I am saying that there are many reasons EVs are great, and with some audiences, you may want to put the emphasis on the other reasons.

  2. Sybil Cramer says:

    Hi Joel — Sadly, my piggy bank is empty (retired English teacher). But I can donate a collaboration tip: NRDC’s webinar call in on Nov. 10th reported as one of its strategies movings forward in the face of a disheartening national election result — is to double their efforts in all 50 states. Perhaps you can join forces — or at least collaborate with their officers in San Francisco: Will forward their info as reply to your email — sfcouncil@nrdc.org

    1. Joel Levin says:

      Thanks for the tip, Sybil.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *