04.10.2012 - by Tom Saxton
Are Taxpayer and Private Dollars Creating Effective Electric Vehicle Infrastructure?

Last December, I started collecting data for a study of the current state of EV Charging Infrastructure. Dozens of Plug In America supporters volunteered to survey local charging sites belonging to the Blink and ChargePoint networks and report on things like parking policy, station condition and station availability. Combining that information with other data collected allows me to build a picture of where we stand today with networked charging infrastructure.

The site survey focuses on determining how often an EV driver can expect to find charging (or disappointment) when visiting a charging site. Other aspects of the study will address station use and availability, and how such things as which network, time of day, day of week, and billing effect station use.

Charger station

Charger station

At EVS-26, I will release a paper titled, “Are Taxpayer and Private Dollars Creating Effective Electric Vehicle Infrastructure?” with the results of that study. I will be available to discuss the study results at Dialog with the Experts, Poster Session 1 in the main exhibit hall on May 7th from 4:30 pm to 6:00 pm. I hope to see you there!

The study is ongoing. Please join the survey if you’d like to help describe the charging sites near you. More results will be released after EVS26.

6 comments on “Are Taxpayer and Private Dollars Creating Effective Electric Vehicle Infrastructure?”
  1. Anonymous says:

    I’ve been a Leaf owner for about a year, and have no complaints about the car, and cost savings associated with solar powered charging, at my home. What is perplexing, is the foot dragging when it comes to fast charging. For example, there is a fully installed 448 unit in Vacaville, which has yet to be turned on. This would be a boon to electric travel between Sacramento and San Francisco. I believe it would also boost electric car sales. Every explanation as to why this is falls under the category of rumor. I heard that a dozen or so fast chargers will be installed around the Bay Area by the end of 2012. That same prediction was being made at the beginning of 2011, and still no availability. What is going on here?

    1. Anonymous says:

      find out who is accountable and hold them too it. make others aware as well.

    2. Tom says:

      The last I heard was that the station in Vacaville was installed before actually getting UL approval. It’s so early in the process for DCQC, and there are so many issues that have to be handled correctly, that there aren’t many stations anywhere, at least not in the US. I specifically excluded DCQC from the EV Infrastructure study because they are so new and so few.

      There are some working in Tennessee and Oregon. Hopefully, there will be many more, although not soon enough to the Leaf owners, many of whom have been waiting for over a year.

    3. Tom says:

      The last I heard was that the station in Vacaville was installed before actually getting UL approval. It’s so early in the process for DCQC, and there are so many issues that have to be handled correctly, that there aren’t many stations anywhere, at least not in the US. I specifically excluded DCQC from the EV Infrastructure study because they are so new and so few.

      There are some working in Tennessee and Oregon. Hopefully, there will be many more, although not soon enough for the Leaf owners, many of whom have been waiting for over a year.

    4. Anonymous says:

      I’d like to get some discussion going of charging costs taking into account utility demand charges. Here on the East Coast this is a really big deal especially as commercial 6.6 kw and higher charging is being looked at. Utility demand charges for an increase in power can mount very quickly here with demand charges of $12-$15.00/kwh/month for increased demand on a commercial rate. Residential rates here too do not reflect the national average but a fully loaded residential rate can be well over $.23 cents/kwh (mine is 11.3 for power and 12.5 or so for wire charges as i recall) with demand charges kicking in for many when summertime air conditioning season hits.

      As such, I suggest that convenience of fast charging be carefully weighed against very high charging costs and the more time spent charging at level 1 the better off the industry would be and those driving will less likely suffer sticker shock. Also if the industry is counting on level 3 chargers scattered about when they are going to have to charge $15.00 – $20.00 for that 70 miles I think there is going to be a lot of grumbling. Comments all you users out there?????

      1. Anonymous says:

        Why would the charge be $15-$20?

        If leaf has 24kw batt and cost is 23cents per KwHr = variable cost is only $5.52

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