Description

The 2017 Nissan LEAF was built from the ground up to be an EV. It is a 5-seater, 4-door hatchback. The LEAF has an 80kW electric motor, powered by Nissan/NEC Li-ion batteries stowed in the floorboard of the vehicle. The batteries will recharge in about 4 hours from a home charger and will charge from 0-80% in less than 30 minutes with a DC quick charger.  The LEAF is offered with a 30kWh battery pack and an EPA estimated 107 mile range.  The LEAF S starts at $32,450 MSRP.   The LEAF also has an available 6.6kW charger that enables a charge time to 4 hours on a Level 2 circuit.

Specs
Nissan Leaf
6 comments on “Nissan LEAF”
  1. Ed says:

    the 2017 Leaf had a safety problem that I read about. Does the 2018 have the same problem
    I am seriously considering to purchase one.

  2. BOB says:

    I have a 2015 Leaf SL. I like the four cameras it has.
    After 40 months, I have replaced the 3 wiper blades and the cabin air filter. I have had the brake fluid flushed and yearly lube and clean the brakes. I open the hood to top up windshield fluid.
    Not sure why some people find it a hassle to plug in. You go home, plug in. No waiting in line to gas up in all kinds of weather. Had a 2017 Volt that got was totaled by an SUV , when I was stopped for a 17 car pile up. Waiting for a Bolt EV due in 4 weeks and my Tesla 3 on order. Sold on electric. Best of all, is I know my cost of electricity is not going up and down each day, like gas prices. Gas price at my station changed 3 times one day last week. Like the stock market. My energy price stays the same, until they have an increase, which does not go up and down like gas. I charge at night when it is cheap. That’s all.

  3. Jeffrey Miner says:

    I just purchased a used 2015 Nissan Leaf in January of 2017 for about $10,000. It had 9500 miles on it. My former cars were all BMWs and a VW GTI. I currently also own two race cars and a Dodge 3500 Cummins turbodiesel. The LEAF affords low-maintenance time and costs, unlike my other vehicles which costs thousands in engine, transmission and cooling system maintenance and repairs. Sure, $2.00 in electricity takes you nearly 80 miles and that’s great, but the real dirty secret with electric cars is NOT just zero emissions, it’s ZERO MAINTENANCE COSTS and ZERO hassles. For that, I love the car. If 80 mile roundtrips fit into your driving lifestyle, the economy and reliability of these cars can’t be beat. My BMW was bankrupting me in emissions, cooling system, driveline and leaky engine seal repairs. Scared of battery replacement costs? Don’t be ridiculous: they’ve gone from $14k for a pack to $6500 and continue to fall in price while affording better reliablity and increased range.

  4. Fred Fischer says:

    I crashed my 2011 Leaf into an Altima and cracked the Leaf’s transmission. My auto insurance bought the wreck and paid me almost enough to buy a used 2015 Leaf. The new Leaf has the same size battery as the old Leaf, but the eco driving mode yields far better range.

  5. After five and a half years and 57K miles, I can say the following about our 2011 LEAF SL:

    • The only thing that has broken is a lift gate strut. Repaired under warranty.
    • The only times I’ve had to lift the hood have been to optionally clean out the dust.
    • The only times it has been at any shop have been to do optional battery health checks, and routine tire/alignment work.

    Really a revolutionary car that continues to show us what is possible when an automaker follows through with a vision.

  6. H.K. Peters, Jr. says:

    I loved my 2012 Nissan Leaf. HOWEVER, I do not live in the city and my range anxiety was 70 miles. Nissan will have to do a lot better. Let me know when.
    The blocked left front visibility was the only other problem.
    Quiet, seamless acceleration was great. So was the braking.

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